Railroad Maintenance

Mag-Probe Railroad Maintenance Post Compilation

Mag-Probe Reducing Downtime in Railroad Maintenance Industry

Railroad Maintenance

Mag-Probe Conducting tests on Locomotive Breaking Systems, Electrical Solenoid Valves, Relays, Fuel Injector Coil Test, EFI Nozzle Test, Pump Testing

Reducing Downtime in Railroad Maintenance

In Railroad maintenance the products and processes that have a proven track record for effectively reducing downtime rise to the top, while the ones that don’t are filtered out.  Below are a few areas where the Bartol Mag-Probe is being used in Railroad Maintenance to Reduce Downtime.

 

BELOW:  Bartol Mag-Probe Model (HS) Used In Railroad Locomotive Repair

Railroad maintenance

Mag-Probe Conducts tests on Locomotive – Breaking Systems, Electrical Solenoid Valves, Relays, Fuel Injector Coils, EFI Nozzles, and Pump Testing

 

  1. Breaking Systems
  2. Testing Electrical Solenoid Valves
  3. Testing Relays
  4. Fuel Injector Coil Test
  5. EFI Nozzle Test
  6. Pump Testing

RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE DOWNTIME THE HIDDEN COST

Bartol Research HS High Sensitivity Mag-Probe Solenoid Tester Offers

NO LOAD TO COMPUTER DRIVERS

Features

  • Magnetic sensing instrument used to troubleshoot AC and DC powered solenoids, solenoid valves, relays and heat controllers
  • Isolates problems as electrical or mechanical in seconds, without a schematic
  • Detects residual magnetism
  • No calibration required
  • Requires no direct electrical connection
  • Variable sensitivity
  • Detects transient pulses and momentary loss of power as low as 10 milliseconds
  • Suitable for high risk explosive environments
  • Long life power source and low current LED lasts for at least 5000, 5-second operations
  • Waterproof, not affected by corrosion or salt spray
  • Ability to check solenoid valves and relays while equipment is operating
  • Works effectively from -80 to +160°F

 

Railroad maintenance

Mag-Probe Conducts tests on Locomotive – Breaking Systems, Electrical Solenoid Valves, Relays, Fuel Injector Coils, EFI Nozzles, and Pump Testing

Hello Bob,

I received the probes and can’t thank you enough. As stated in the other email I’ve been using the Mag-Probes for 10 years as a locomotive electrician and it is one of the tools I use on a daily basis. With electronic fuel injection it is easier than a meter to see if voltage is present at the injector. These are some of the best probes I’ve ever used, thanks so much again for your help.

TinnerBoy

 

We are very grateful to all the hard working technicians in railroad maintenance that have given us all this great feed back.  If there is anything else you are doing that is creative and innovative please contact me personally at 208-321-7566. Bob Bartol

 

MAG-PROBE LOCOMOTIVE INTERFACE UNIT RELAY TEST

 

Railroad Maintenance

 (Special Note) The Mag-Probe Can Not be Used to Test High Current Output Relays (17-21).  In the Locomotive Interface Unit Due to one set of the Two Exposed Contacts ALWAYS being Energized and the Relay ALWAYS indicated on.

 

Here is the Bartol Mag-Probe Locomotive Interface Unit Relays Test

Testing EPIC Control Portion Magnet Valves – EPIC 3102/II – Locomotive Interface Unit Relay

Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 8.34.54 PMScreen Shot 2014-10-07 at 8.39.00 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 8.29.59 PM

Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 8.31.20 PM

Testing Locomotive Interface Unit Relays

 MagProbeUsing a Bartol Mag-Probe

Place the Mag-Probe near the locomotive interface unit relay coil to be Tested.   Relay numbers can be identified by the silkscreening on the printed onThe Printed Circuit Board.

Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 6.57.17 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If the Relay being Tested is Energized the Mag-Probe

LED will be illuminated

 Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 6.57.28 PM

If the Relay being Tested is Energized the Mag-Probe

LED will be illuminated

(AS Shown Above)

 (Special Note) The Mag-Probe Can Not be Used to Test High Current Output Relays (17-21).  In the Locomotive Interface Unit Due to one set of the Two Exposed Contacts ALWAYS being Energized and the Relay ALWAYS indicated on.

 

Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 8.20.23 PM To Test High Output Current Relays (17 -21) Depress the Contacts as Shown. Contact Movement Indicates the Relay is De-Energized.

 

 

 

 


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For technical questions please contact Inventor Bob Bartol at 208-321-7566

Email Bob at inventorbobis@gmail.com

 


 

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About the Author
Bob Bartol has spent his whole life working with electronics in almost every capacity and spent many hours in Physics classes. He currently holds 4 U.S. patents and has been making a living off one of the patents "The Bartol Mag-Probe" for over twenty years. Bartol Research's Mag-Probe now has a global reach and is dramatically reducing trouble shooting downtime anywhere a solenoid valve. relay, or contactor is used. F111 Air Force Projects - European Flight Competition January 1968 Bob attended electronics school in the Air Force. Upon graduation he was assigned to a fighter wing in Germany. During his assignment he prepared seven aircraft for European competition. The fighter wings aircraft won the competition. Bob then returned to the United States and taught advanced radar for two years. Two years later, he returned to Europe. During this assignment, Air Force headquarters Europe selected Bob to open a Precision Measuring Equipment Laboratory (P.M.E.L) in England. It was the first of its kind in the Air Force. Upon his return to the United States, Air Force headquarters assigned Bob to Air Force research command in Florida. This was strictly a scientific assignment for research and development. After three years he moved from Eglin AFB in Florida to Edwards Air Force Base in California where he had direct contact with the National Bureau of Standards and supported research and development aircraft. During this assignment, he designed a modification for the TF X fighter (F-111). This modification made possible an additional 9800 flying hours per year. The F111 was the first swing wing aircraft in history. General Dynamics completed the modification prior to acceptance by the U.S. Air Force. Modification of F111 Aircraft General Dynamics March 1968 As a result of increasing this flying time Bob Received an award from Edwards Air Force Base for Increasing flying time of the F111 by 9,800 hours per year. The Award was Presented by Colonel Grumbles to TSGT Bob Bartol on June 17, 1968

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